Surname Saturday: My Matrilineal Line, Starting with MASSEY

I have always been closer to my mother’s family than to my father’s, primarily because my paternal relatives were much older – my father was 10th of 13 children and my paternal grandparents were already gone long before I was born. In addition, that family was fairly far-flung, whereas my mother’s family tended to all live near home, or visited often, especially during the summer months. I spent at least some time with nearly all of my maternal cousins, but only knew a few of the younger paternal cousins.

Because I was closer to my mother’s family and enjoyed spending time with my grandmother during our visits, my interests in family history have always focused more keenly on my maternal lines. I have made an effort over the years to also follow through on my father’s family lines, but to be honest, my tree still leans heavily toward my mother’s side!

Having recently had my DNA testing done, I’ve developed a strong interest in pushing through brick walls on my matrilineal line. Specifically, I would love to take my mother’s-mother’s-mother’s line back as far as I can. Currently, I can go back to my 5th great-grandmother, Catherine Massey.

My known matrilineal line is as follows: Catherine Massey, mother of Catherine Barrier, mother of Malinda Baker, mother of Isabell Vaughn, mother of Laura Jones, mother of Magoldia Abbott, who is my mother.

My knowledge of Catherine Massey is fairly limited. Of course, this is not unusual for women of her time as there is typically little to be found of them in the written record during the time she lived in. Fortunately, Catherine lived a long life, surviving beyond the 1850 Federal Census, allowing for additional clues of her life to be made available.

I will begin at the end, as we tend to do in genealogical research.

September 1855: According to the death records available on Ancestry.com (Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1953 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007), Catherine Barrier died on the South Fork of the Cumberland River in Wayne County, Kentucky in September 1855. Catherine was an 87 year old widow and a resident of Wayne County, Kentucky. According to the database, Catherine died of old age. Her mother is not identified; her father is listed simply as “Massey”.

catherine barrier death 1855 copy

Records such as this, indexes built from original records, are only as accurate as the original information given and the accuracy of the information transcriber, so, there are of course opportunities to question the correctness of this information. For instance, this same record does indicate that Catherine Massey Barrier was born in Wayne County, Kentucky. This would not be possible, however, as neither Wayne County, nor Kentucky actually existed at the time Catherine would have been born (1768). As a matter of fact, Catherine’s birth predates even the formation of Kentucky County, Virginia which was formed in December 1776.

Obviously, Catherine was not born in Kentucky.

I have seen her grave site – she is buried next to her husband Richard Barrier, who died in July 1854 in Wayne County, Kentucky at age 86 of old age dysentery.

1850 Federal Census: Catherine, aged 82 and Richard, aged 81, reside together in Wayne County, Kentucky. They are the only two listed in the household. They both identify “Kentucky” as their state of birth, although we know this is not really possible.

1840 Federal Census: Richard Barrier heads a household in Wayne County, Kentucky that includes one free white male, age 70-79, a free white female, age 70-79, a free white male age 15-19, and a female slave aged 55-99.

One individual in the household in Wayne County, Kentucky is employed in “agriculture”, one is employed in “learned professional engineers”. One white person over age 20 cannot read or write. Richard was known to have been a Baptist Minister and officiated a number of marriages in early Wayne County, Kentucky history; I assume he is the learned individual. As the other male is aged less than 20 years, and the 4th person is a slave, I believe that Catherine is the individual over age 20 who is not able to read or write.

1830 Federal Census: Richard Barrier (Byers, an alternate spelling) heads a household with a 60-69 year old male and a 60-69 year old female, as well as one free white male age 15-19 and one female slave, aged 24-35.

1789-1830: It is not yet entirely clear to me where Catherine Massey Barrier and her husband are at this time; I am currently researching the records. There are a number of Massey households in the Lincoln County, North Carolina area in the 1790 Census.

1789, 20 August: This is the date for a marriage bond for Richard Barrier and Katrine Messey in Lincoln County, North Carolina. I need to see the actual documents for this marriage, as sometimes additional information is to be found that is not reflected in the indices available on Ancestry.com.

1768: This is the approximate year of Catherine Massey’s birth. As I do not know her father’s first name, nor the name of her mother, Catherine Massey remains a brick wall for me.

I hope additional research and review of original records will allow me to identify her parents’ names. I would especially love to find her mother’s name, of course.

1810 Kentucky – Greenwell Households Found in the Federal Census

The Greenwell family began migrating into Kentucky as early as 1810. They migrated from St Mary’s County, Maryland after the Revolutionary War and primarily settled in the area surrounding what is now Louisville, Kentucky. One of my projects is to follow this family in two directions, back into the past and forward to my husband’s current family.

Eleven Greenwell households can be found in the 1810 Kentucky Federal Census.

1810 Federal Census: Nelson County, Kentucky
John Greenwell (page 19/88)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
2 – Free White Females Under 10
0 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

Albin Greenwell (page 20/48)
3 – Free White Males Under 10
1 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
1 – Free White Females Under 10
1 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0- All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

Jno (Jonathan?) Greenwell (page 22/38)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
2 – Free White Females Under 10
0 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

Eliza Greenwell (page 22/38)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
1 – Free White Females Under 10
2 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

Joshua Greenwell (page 22/38)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Males 45 and over
1 – Free White Females Under 10
1 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
5 – Slaves

Henry Greenwell (page 23/38)
1 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
0 – Free White Females Under 10
0 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

1810 Federal Census: Washington County, Kentucky
John Greenwell (page 29/57)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
2 – Free White Females Under 10
0 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
1 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

Mary Greenwell (page 30/57)
1 – Free White Males Under 10
0 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Males 45 and over
0 – Free White Females Under 10
3 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

1810 Federal Census: Scott County, Kentucky
Ignatius Greenwell (page 19/27)
0 – Free White Males Under 10
2 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Males 45 and over
0 – Free White Females Under 10
0 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
7 – Slaves

1810 Federal Census: Hardin County, Kentucky
James Greenwell (page 18/24)
1 – Free White Males Under 10
1 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Males 45 and over
0 – Free White Females Under 10
2 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
0 – Slaves

1810 Federal Census: Scott County, Kentucky
Bennet Greenwell (page 6/27)
2 – Free White Males Under 10
1 – Free White Males 10 thru 15
2 – Free White Males 16 thru 25
0 – Free White Males 26 thru 44
1 – Free White Males 45 and over
1 – Free White Females Under 10
3 – Free White Females 10 thru 15
0 – Free White Females 16 thru 25
1 – Free White Females 26 thru 44
0 – Free White Females 45 and over
0 – All Other Free Persons
9 – Slaves

Source: 1810 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

Joseph Baker and Catherine Barrier: Happy 193rd Anniversary!

caty and joseph

TRANSCRIPTION:
March the 29 1820
Sir you Will plese to give Mr Joseph Baker a purmit for the celibration of marriage With Caty Barrier given under my hand this 29th march Richard Barrier to the Revarand Johon Chrisman Clk To the County of Wayne

—-

My 4th great grandfather and grandmother, Joseph Baker and Catherine Barrier were married on April 1, 1820 in Wayne County, Kentucky, according to records located in Wayne County, Kentucky.

Joseph Baker, born around 1798 in Virginia, appears to have arrived in Kentucky, sometime prior to 1820, at which time he is recorded as a head of household in the Wayne County, Kentucky 1820 Federal Census.  The household is comprised of two free white persons, one male and one female, both between the ages of 16 and 25 years.  Catherine Barrier, whom he wed prior to the census taking, was 17 or 18 years old at that time; Joseph was about 22 years old.

Joseph and Catherine raised a large family in Wayne County, Kentucky.  By the time of the 1850 Federal Census,  Joseph (52) was a Justice of the Peace and his estate was valued at $500. In 1850, Catherine’s parents, Richard Barrier (81) and Catherine Massey Barrier (82) lived in the adjoining household. Richard Barrier is identified as a Baptist Preacher; he was indeed one of the earliest ministers in the area and established a large number of churches in the area, according to family history.

By 1860, Joseph (62) and Catherine (58) still reside in Wayne County, Kentucky with their youngest child, Isaac and are raising their granddaughter, Perlitha (also known as Telitha) Baker, the daughter of their son Silas and his wife Minerva Coffey, who died in December 1854 of Flux.  Perlitha/Telitha would have been an infant at the time of her mother’s death. In 1870, Joseph (72) and Catherine (68) remain at home in Wayne County, Kentucky, still living with their granddaughter now recorded as Telitha Baker; she is 16 years old.

In 1880, Joseph (82) and Catherine Baker (77) are living with their son, his second wife Susan and their two children in Wayne County, Kentucky.

On April 1, 1892, Joseph Baker died on his 72nd anniversary at age 94. Catherine preceded him in death in 1890, at age 87-88. They are both buried in the Corder Cemetery in Wayne County, Kentucky.

Sarah Elizabeth Cummins Cassada (1856 – 1929)

Sarah E. Cassada obituary, Anderson, Indiana, Anderson Daily Bulletin, November 14, 1929, page 6, section 1:

Image

Sarah Cassada was born Sarah Elizabeth Cummins on March 28, 1856 in Whitley County, Kentucky. Her parents were James Cummins and Nancy Hill.

Sarah married Samuel Monroe Cassada on October 16, 1879 in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Sarah was 22 years old, Samuel was 26 years old; this was the first marriage for both.

Sarah and Samuel had twelve children born between 1880 and 1901. My paternal grandmother, Lutie Mae Cassada was the oldest, born on August 25, 1880 in Sloans Valley, Pulaski County, Kentucky.

The surviving children mentioned in the above obituary are: Mrs. Claude Councellor (Geneva), Mrs. Robert Davis (Lutie, my grandmother), Mrs. Paris Davis (Olive), Mrs. George Lorton (Laura), Mrs. Max Terhune (Maude), Mrs. Moreland Fleming – (Monnie), Oscar Cassada, Arthur Cassada, Harley Cassada.

Sarah was preceded in death by her husband Samuel and three children: Edgar, Pearl, and Delbert.

Sarah Cassada was returned to Kentucky for burial at the Oak Hill Church Cemetery, Somerset, Pulaski County, Kentucky.

Thanks, Mom! – My First Post to Running in the Family

Like most everyone else, my story begins with my mother.

goldia davis 16 years

From Birth Certificate:
Name: Magnola Abbott
Born: 21 July 1927, Ritner, Wayne County, Kentucky
Father: Isaac Abbott, white, age 30 years, born in Ritner, Kentucky, farmer
Mother: Laura Jones, white, aged 29 years, born in Ritner, Kentucky, housework
Midwife: Lewis Vaughn (Laura’s maternal grandfather)

She was kind and true, she was strict, she was hopeful. She did not have an easy life, but she was always certain that things would turn out right. She beamed with inner peace. She loved her family. She loved to laugh! She is the person who has passed that I miss the most and think of daily.

Goldia Abbott was born in Ritner, Wayne County, Kentucky on July 21, 1927. She was the fourth child, and the third living child of John Isaac Abbott and Laura Jones. Her maternal grandfather, Lewis Vaughn, practiced midwifery in the community and delivered her, as well as several of her siblings.

My grandmother told me that she had intended to name my mother Magoldia, however her name was recorded as Magnola Abbott on the birth certificate. My mother chose to ignore her legal name and continued to use the name Magoldia formally, and used Goldia or Goldia most commonly throughout her life.

My genealogical journey began with my mother and her mother, Laura Mae Jones Abbott, both of whom loved to recall family stories. They both had a fantastic ability to remember everything – names, dates, places, the color of a dress, the make of an otherwise forgotten automobile. In the early 1980s, while I was in college, my mother and I would spend many weekends with her mother. One or more of her sisters would join us and we would pass hours at the dining room table telling family story after story. At some point I had taken to writing down the names and dates.

After my grandmother died, my mother and I began going to the state archives and visiting cemeteries to secure data that would support the family history I had recorded. All in all, my grandmother’s memory was really quite accurate when compared to the available census and vital records.

This first blog entry is a way of saying thank you to my mother, for giving me a love of family, and a love of family history.

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